Us caregiver’s take on the role of care-giving because we have to, because we want to, but most of all because we love someone who needs us to fulfill this role. I’m going to dive right in and state that sometimes I want to bang my head on the keyboard when I see or hear another reference to ‘tough love’ like it is something to be shunned and ashamed of. The idea that by practicing ‘tough love’, one is not practicing ‘unconditional love’. Love is defined as an intense feeling of deep affection.Read More →

Last month on the 28th of February I tried to commit suicide for the third time.. I took an overdose and cut both my wrist so deep that I needed stitches.. The Monday I got admitted to a psychiatric hospital for the second time in two years..Read More →

Sometimes when writing or blogging I will use the term roller coaster… As a parent or caregiver of someone with a mental illness it is a term a lot of us use. A very fitting term if you ask me. There are lots of different roller coasters throughout the world. One of the top ten being the Bizarro (formerly known as Superman: Ride of Steel) in Agawam, Massachusetts USA. My favorite, possible because I have ridden it, is the Ghoster Coaster. It’s a small wooden one in Canada’s Wonderland in Ontario, Canada.Read More →

I don’t like to use my blog for rants, but I am angry. And if I’m being compassionate with myself, then my anger is just as valid as any other feeling. So I’m going to give myself permission to write about my anger. I was telling a friend recently about the presentation I gave at work on self-compassion, and he responded with hostility and disdain. I was not prepared for the attack. I understand that some people prefer the “suck it up” approach to pain and suffering, but why would it make him angry that I teach people how to be kind to themselves instead?Read More →

Written by Kelly Risbey http://mentalhealthwarrior.com/ I’ve battled anxiety and depression on and off for almost 20 years. My anxiety started getting bad in high school and I started having panic attacks in my second year of university. This led to my panic disorder diagnosis and my first major battle with anxiety. Trying to manage school, maintain a good GPA, cope with panic attacks that happened during class, deal with endless anxiety issues, find support, and learn how to battle my panic disorder was exhausting, frustrating, terrifying. All I wanted was my life back. I wanted to go to class, take notes, listen to the lecture,Read More →

As I’ve speak about frequently,  my family, in the form of my daughter, has been crucial to my recovery. When it came down to it, and I truly needed her to be there, she was.  When I was in the hospital in Orlando, the first outside call I made was to her.  My life was in crisis, and I knew I had her unconditional love.  Which she freely gave.  And we planned on my making a move to live near her. However it could be accomplished.  Not everybody is as lucky as I was in this regard.  Many of those living with mental illness don’tRead More →

By Rufus William, May 19, 2014 http://www.time-to-change.org.uk/ I have had problems with depression for my whole adult life. Despite running as fast as I can away from it, with a desperation to put it behind me, it always comes back. For all my successes, for all my acceptance and understanding of myself, for all my progress as a well-adjusted adult, it won’t leave me. Depression will still hijack my feelingsRead More →

I have been thinking for a while what people should realize about mental health.. This is my personal experience last year.. This one time I had to visit my Psychiatrist and in that time I was cutting heavy bad..Read More →

Trying to give an opinion about whether or not people, especially teenagers, should be given medication to cope with certain forms of mental illness always seems to end up in stalemate. I know what I think about it, but it’s probably not what you think. And so, what I’m going to describe is what I went through and what I believe. I’m not advocating a course of action for anyone else. When I was first given anti-depressants as a teenager, I thought I was finally going to be a happy person. I was told I had a chemical imbalance and I would have to takeRead More →